Dating a sex worker

“You have sex with men, you make love to men, sure,” he says.

The conversation about sex work has become frank in recent years as mankind’s oldest profession adapts to the digital era.

You're not being paid to date, so don't spend your time on the clock making googly eyes across the conference room table. Your coworkers shouldn't have to be a part of any relationship squabbles and take sides, and you shouldn't ask them to. Obviously you have each other's back — just as you would for any colleague you respect — but don't rely on your love interest to help you score a coveted account, new role, or praise from your boss. It's nearly impossible to bring work or stress home with you, but it's even harder to avoid when you and your S. If you're really trying to build a healthy relationship, these boundaries will help you exist as a couple in the real world (read: outside the office). Working alongside your boo and then seeing him after work can driven even the most adoring person mad.

This goes beyond just physical PDA — keep conversations at the office related to the job. You'll end up looking far worse and pettier than the object of your anger. It's much more satisfying to succeed on your own merit, and everyone else will appreciate your achievements more if you've earned them. And, if you're more interested in keeping it light, it's always more fun to talk about, well, anything besides work. Try doing your own thing: Take Italian classes, learn to code, see your girls — anything to maintain identity.

Office romances have been around for as long as offices (or other workplaces).

Because of the amount of time we spend at work, side by side with our coworkers, our social lives and professional lives often become entwined.

But sometimes, that's way easier said than done — especially if your job requires you to spend long hours and tight cubicles with the same person.

Tempting (and steamy) as it may be, it can also turn out to be super awkward and traumatic — something we all saw unfold on the first season of 1. Like in the "think about it for a few extra days" way, not in the literal sense.

“The image people have of male sex workers is totally wrong,” Maxime says.

“I’m providing a professional service for my clients.

“It’s calls, it’s networking, it’s publicity.” Based in Montreal, Maxime is a male sex worker who services primarily straight and bisexual female clients.

He’s been a sex worker for five years; only after the first three could he do the work full time.

Men already have that notion in their head because of our history, our culture.